It’s Really Not My Night….

No sooner have I hit “publish” on my previous post than it happens again.

pixpls

This is the line in my profile where I apparently “demand” pictures.

pictures

It’s obviously not my night. Please tell me why it’s such a big deal that someone doesn’t answer for all of 15 minutes (ok, maybe 25, since I was shaving a month of growth off my legs ready for the hot weather tomorrow). How is that “playing games”?!?!  Sure, I responded to his comment about Charles and Camilla (is that important to him ?!?!) jotted in 5 seconds before I went offline, but “pix of you” out of nowhere is not going to get a response, please or no please.

And he spelt “semantics” wrong.

(At then end of an actual conversation, “I have really enjoyed chatting to you. Can I see your pictures, please?” would likely have worked).

I think I’ll give up for tonight, unless you think I can go three for three 😛 😉

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Fastest way to make me lose interest…..

One of my pet peeves when online dating is when you are asked for a pic right off the bat. On one site I’m on, my pictures are set to private so I ‘open’ them only to specific contacts. My previous modus operandi when someone asked to see my pics within the first few lines of introductory conversation was to shrug and do it. Then I changed tactics and preferred to chat a little first, especially if someone hadn’t written much on their profile. I don’t really know which works better – I’ve had people delete me right away trying both tactics, so I now go with my gut on a case-by-case basis and when in doubt try to chat first. I’m looking for something deeper than looks (and for someone who is also looking deeper than looks), after all, and while physical attraction is a must, it can develop with time.

mm1Take this guy. His profile was well-written and reasonably interesting, and although I wasn’t attracted to his pic, I accepted his request. He seemed to have a little more depth than some people you find online, but that impression ended up being a touch incorrect. This was the end of our conversation (there was only about 5 or 6 lines above this. Names and most of his face cropped for privacy. And sorry for my poor screenshot alignment…).

The ‘busty’ comment refers to one line I have in my profile (which I wrote some time ago, so it took me a moment to make the connection) which says something along the lines of ‘If you like girls who have double D boobs and wear make-up 20 hours a day, I’m not the one for you’. I wasn’t sure whether he was kidding about being ‘dumped’ or not, but it sure wasn’t endearing.

I am perfectly comfortable with who I am and what I look like (no Kate Moss, but I can turn heads on occasion) and have no issues with the fact that I won’t be everyone’s ‘type’. My theory is that it’s better to weed out who you can as early as possible when online dating. If someone is hung up on big boobs, I don’t want them wasting my time.
Of course, there’s no guarantee that someone will actually read your profile before sending you a contact request…

So, what’s your theory? Unlock pics when asked or chat first?

It Hurts Just A Little

DeletedWhen you log on to your dating site and see a contact has deleted you, reactions may range from “Oh NO!!! :*( ” to “Oh 😦 ” to “Meh, no loss” to even “Thank goodness. I was just about to do that”.
It depends on the contact. When I saw D had deleted me, it was an “Oh 😦 ” with a feeling like a little dart to the heart. Sure, it’s not like we were going to get back together, and I’ve been chatting to other guys, but it often hurts just a little when you log on to see an icon has faded.
[image: the outline icon second from the top – deleted. Solid grey icons – contact is offline. Orange icon – contact is online]

Scientific Facts About Cheaters

Here are some facts from “Science” about cheaters:

1) Cheaters are more likely to get a broken penis.

2) They take their “secret” dates to greasy chain restaurants. (Actually, I don’t know if they are greasy, since we don’t have the ones mentioned in Australia, or at least none I’ve been to).

3) I know from experience that there are A LOT of cheaters online, but online cheaters are actually more likely to be female, and around 40% of users are married (and I know that while a lot of them lie, some are completely honest about it).

4) Cheaters tweet a lot.

5) They are not necessarily in an unhappy relationship (they are just assholes).

6) Their ring fingers are longer than their middle fingers (just one more reason to look at a guy’s hands on the first date – check the length as well as for ring lines…)

See?
Entirely scientific!

A Bit of Light Relief

Here are some cartoons about dating from one of my favourite cartoons, Savage Chickens.
We all need a little giggle at this strange strange world of dating…

http://www.savagechickens.com/tag/dating

This is one of my favourites 🙂

Online Dating Profile of the Day

It’s been a while since I’ve posted a Profile of the Day, so here are two!

First, we have “Play Naughty Dude”:

Image

He went on a rambling rant with inadequate punctuation about “being me” and cuddles, and then in a different section he’d described himself as “Not romantic”.

*Shakes head and clicks the “block” button*

Next we have “Average Bloke”, although something tells me he’s not so much an average bloke…

Image

Maybe he means he’s an average cross-dresser, and who wants one of those? If you’re going to cross-dress, you should go the whole hog and strut your stuff down the street, showing off legs that are probably better than mine.

Either way, though, he’s another who gets a laugh and a NO. Just not my type, dear.

Ghosting

The New York Times recently ran an article about “ghosting” in a relationship – aka rather than having a closing conversation, one person “ghosts” the other, simply fading away and ignoring any contact by the other party.

“Ghosting” is the same idea as “if he’s not calling/texing, he’s just not into you,” which I hate. I think it’s a pathetic excuse for men to act like assholes.

The NYT also ran a follow-up article of responses to the first. It was interesting to read a response from someone who described a friend – not a partner – doing the fade.

Personally, I think if you’ve passed the 3-to-5-date mark, SOME sort of closure is required. Even when I meet someone online and we have a first “meeting” in real life (doesn’t even have to be a date), I think a simple, “Thanks for meeting. I don’t think we have much in common. I wish you all the best,” or some such afterwards is just plain polite, although it’s not always 100% necessary, and “ghosting” isn’t so bad after just one meeting – sometimes they just naturally fade out of your memory and you simply forget to send a closing message.

From the responses in the NYT article, I do agree that in a few circumstances ghosting is necessary. If someone isn’t getting the hint that things are over and continues contact, especially toxic contact, then ignoring them is the best policy, but that is only after you’ve had the “It’s over” conversation and left them in no doubt you don’t want further contact. It’s just cruel to leave someone with hope if there isn’t any.

I would much rather have a guy tell me why he was ending it, especially when it comes out of nowhere (D, I’m talking to you). I would much rather a guy break up with me by telling me, “I think you’re a boring bitch. You farted in your sleep and I never want to see you again”. It would hurt, sure, but most break-ups hurt. At least this way I’d be clear on where we both stand, and I’d be able to accept it and move on much easier than if I were left over-thinking things and trying to figure out what went wrong.

How about you?